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Ms. Miller Locker

Ms. Miller

Speech-Language Therapy
Speech-Language Therapy

What is Speech-Language Pathology?

School based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) work to prevent, assess, diagnose, and treat speech, language, social communication, and cognitive-communication disorders.

  • Speech disorders occur when a person has difficulty producing speech sounds correctly or fluently (e.g., stuttering is a form of dysfluency) or has problems with his or her voice or resonance.
  • Language disorders occur when a person has trouble understanding others (receptive language), or sharing thoughts, ideas, and feelings (expressive language). Language disorders may be spoken or written and may involve the form (phonology, morphology, syntax), content (semantics), and/or use (pragmatics) of language in functional and socially appropriate ways.
  • Social communication disorders occur when a person has trouble with the social use of verbal and nonverbal communication. These disorders may include problems (a) communicating for social purposes (e.g., greeting, commenting, asking questions), (b) talking in different ways to suit the listener and setting, and (c) following rules for conversation and story-telling. All individuals with autism spectrum disorder have social communication problems. Social communication disorders are also found individuals with other conditions, such as traumatic brain injury.
  • Cognitive-communication disorders include problems organizing thoughts, paying attention, remembering, planning, and/or problem-solving. These disorders usually happen as a result of a stroke, traumatic brain injury, or dementia, although they can be congenital.

What are voice, speech, and language?

Voice, speech, and language are the tools we use to communicate with each other.

Voice is the sound we make as air from our lungs is pushed between vocal folds in our larynx, causing them to vibrate.

Speech is talking, which is one way to express language. It involves the precisely coordinated muscle actions of the tongue, lips, jaw, and vocal tract to produce the recognizable sounds that make up language.

Language is a set of shared rules that allow people to express their ideas in a meaningful way. Language may be expressed verbally or by writing, signing, or making other gestures, such as eye blinking or mouth movements.

Calendar

Useful Links for Parents

Apraxia Kids

http://www.apraxia-kids.org/

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/index.html

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/actearly/milestones/

 

Learning Disabilities Association of America 

http://ldaamerica.org/

 

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/voice/pages/speechandlanguage.aspx/

 

North Coastal Consortium for Special Education (NCCSE)

http://nccse.org/family/families-home

 

NINDS Learning Disabilities Information Page 

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/learningdisabilities/learningdisabilities.htm

 

Super Duper Publications 

https://www.superduperinc.com/Handouts/Handout.aspx 

 

The Hanen Centre

http://www.hanen.org/Helpful-Info.aspx

 

The Stuttering Foundation

http://www.stutteringhelp.org/

 

U.S. Department of Education 

http://www2.ed.gov/parents/landing.jhtml

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fun Links for Kids

CoolMath

http://www.coolmath.com/

Khan Academy 

https://www.khanacademy.org/

KPBS Kids

http://www.kpbs.org/kids/

Starfall: Learn to Read with Phonics, Learn Mathematics 

http://www.starfall.com/